Stephen King- The Wild, Weird, and Wonderful

Pretend like I blogged on Tuesday, when I was going to.A little back story: I’m a speed-reader. You’d think that’d be great, except I devour books like food. Because I had read all my book a bazillion times, I turned to my mother’s.

The movie poster- tell me that clown isn’t scary.

Thus, I am now reading pretty much everything Stephen King has ever written. Today’s review? It.

It is iconic and I guess the fuel behind most clown phobias. Literally, coulrophobia I’m telling you, the next time I see a clown I’m going to scream, “Please don’t tear off my arm!”

It is a monster of a book, some 1,100 pages, so I’ll have to give you the short version.

In Derry, Maine, things have never been quite right. Every 27 or so years, there are bloody crime sprees, especially the murders of children. In 1958, little Georgie Denbrough is the first child to die.  From there, it gains velocity. The townspeople speculate about perverts and drifters.

Only the children can see the clown lurking in the sewers.

The first days of summer brings together Bill Denbrough, stutterer; Eddie Kaspbrak, asmathic; Richie Tozier, the boy with terrible imitations; Ben Hascom, fat and friendless; Stan Uris, Jewish; Mike Hanlon, black; and Beverly Marsh, tough and hiding the evidence of her father’s fists. They are the Losers, and they will oppose It. And ultimately, stop It.

At least, that’s what they thought.

27 years after the last murder in 1958,  the murders begin again. And so do the reports of a clown in the sewers.

The Losers swore to return if it ever came back.  Every one of them has forgotten their childhood, has forgotten It entirely.

It has not forgotten them.

Author: Stephen King

Pages:1,138

Genre: Horror, Mystery

Lindsay’s verdict: Absolutely terrfying, in the way only Stephen King is.

Four out of five stars: The writing and plot are great, but there is one “WHAT?!” moment (you will know it), and the end didn’t fully satisfy me.

Next post will also be Stephen King-centric: 11/22/63. Au revoir!

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